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Principles of Sustainability

Principle Four

Maintain and, if possible, enhance the quality of society through community building

A sustainable society is one that persists and thrives. It provides a high quality of life for all of its inhabitants without harming the integrity and productivity of the natural systems and resources upon which all life depends. Humans' needs and desires are met within the limits of what nature can provide. Choices on design, particularly at medium and high density, greatly affect energy use and natural materials consumption. Public transport and road investment, and decisions that affect an individual’s car ownership choices are important when talking about improving the quality of society through community building.

PRINCIPLES

4.1 Communities should be the primary focus of responsibility for creating a sustainable society
Communities should be the primary locus of responsibility for creating a sustainable society.  This is because most of the individual behaviors and governmental policies that support sustainability are best nurtured at the local level.  The human species has an innate inclination to care about our neighbors and our community, and the beauty of the natural environment in the place which we happen to call home. 
4.2 A sustainable society should value cultural diversity
A sustainable society values diversity because it provides strength and resilience to the human community, just as it does in nature.  A sustainable society resolves the inherent conflicts among its members through peaceful, respectful and non-violent means.
4.3 A community should contain an ample supply of open space 
The community should contain an ample supply of specialized open space in the form of squares, greens and parks whose frequent use is encouraged through placement and design.
4.4 Infrastructure systems that encourage more efficient, productive use of resources should be used
Infrastructure can be defined as the basic facilities, services, and installations needed for the functioning of a community or society. Sustainable infrastructure systems deal with energy systems, water and wastewater, stormwater management, and solid waste management. Though the solutions for each sector differ, all grew out of creative thinking, a team approach to problem-solving, and a belief in more efficient, productive use of resources. 
4.5 Communities should use and invest in technology that supports the ability of local enterprises to succeed, improves civic life, and provide open access to information and resources
Communities should use and invest in technology that supports the ability of local enterprises to succeed, improves civic life, and provides open access to information and resources.

Coupled with the development of online educational content and access to useful information online (like job opportunities, childcare, health and benefits information) progress can be made in wired communities.
4.6

Employment and a healthy and safe work environment should be available to anyone willing to prepare themselves (education, training, attitude and ethic) for work
The ability to find work, be provided with healthy work and stay healthy is significantly shaped by socio-economic status. Employment is one of the most strongly evidenced determinants of health.  People’s employment status and the nature of their work have a direct bearing on their physical and mental health and even their life expectancy.  This is related to income, a sense of making a valuable contribution and increased social networks gained through work.

4.7 Individuals should have the opportunity to obtain education and training to develop work and life skills
Because human resources are so valuable in the information age, communities should provide life-long skills and learning opportunities by investing in excellent schools, post-secondary institutions, and opportunities for continuous education and training available to all.
4.8 Regional institutions and services (government, stadiums, museums, etc.) should be available in the urban core
Regional institutions and services (government, stadiums, museums, etc.) should be located in the urban core.
4.9 Materials and methods of construction should be specific to the climate and region
Materials and methods of construction should be specific to the region, exhibiting a continuity of history and culture and compatibility with the climate to encourage the development of local character and community identity.
4.10 Integration of transit systems should be promoted and encouraged
The location and character of the community should be consistent with a larger transit network.  The regional land-use planning structure should be integrated within a larger transportation network built around transit rather than freeways.
4.11 Measures to minimize the impacts of vehicles and transportation should be promoted and encouraged
Measures to minimize the impact that vehicles, the manufacturing of vehicles, the construction of roads, and production of cement have  on the environment.  Most cities are dependent upon global transportation systems. Particulates and other pollutants from the burning of fossil fuels and biomass are transported long distances. Global air chemistry is thus affected by local air pollution. Further, humans suffer health effects due to air pollution from distant sources.
4.12 Streets, pedestrian paths and bike paths should contribute to a fully integrated system to all destinations
Streets, pedestrian paths and bike paths should contribute to a system of fully-connected and interesting routes to all destinations. Their design should encourage pedestrian and bicycle use by being small and spatially defined by buildings, trees and lighting; and by discouraging high speed traffic.

The Principles of Sustainability

The following list of principles is an attempt to provide a set of principles for sustainability applicable at all scales; global, national, regional, local and by the individual. 

PRINCIPLE I PRINCIPLE II PRINCIPLE III PRINCIPLE IV

PRINCIPLE V

PRINCIPLE VI PRINCIPLE VII
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SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

Sponsors are a critically important part to the success of ISC-Audubon. As a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating sustainability, we offer all of our programs to our members free of charge, and are publicly available for download on our website.

ISC-Audubon is proud to extend the opportunity to select businesses and organizations to become sponsors of our sustainability education and advocacy programs. As a sponsor, your business or organization can realize significant value.

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A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

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