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Principles of Sustainability

Principle Six

Maintain and, if possible, enhance economic vitality

A viable local economy is essential to sustainability. This includes job opportunities, sufficient tax base and revenue to support government and the provision of infrastructure and services, and a suitable business climate. A sustainable economy is also diversified, so that it is not easily disrupted by internal or external events or disasters, and such an economy does not simply shift the costs of maintaining its good health onto other regions or onto the oceans or atmosphere. Nor is a sustainable local economy reliant on unlimited population growth, high consumption, or nonrenewable resources.

PRINCIPLES

6.1 Landowners have the right to use resources responsibly
Land owners have the right to exploit their own resources pursuant to their own environmental and developmental policies, federal, state and local laws, and the responsibility to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other areas beyond their limits of jurisdiction.
6.2 Sustainable economic growth is essential
Cooperation to promote a supportive and open economic system that would lead to economic growth and sustainable development to better address the problems of environmental degradation is essential. Trade policy measures for environmental purposes should not constitute a means of arbitrary or unjustifiable discrimination or a disguised restriction on trade.. Environmental measures addressing transboundary or global environmental problems should, as far as possible, be based on an international consensus.
6.3 Government, business, education, and the community should work together to create a vibrant local economy
Government, business, education, and the community should work together to create a vibrant local economy, through a long-term investment strategy that encourages local enterprise, serves the needs of local residents, workers, and businesses, promotes stable employment and revenues by building on local competitive advantages, protects the natural environment, increases social equity and is capable of succeeding in the global marketplace.
6.4 Communities and regions need a vision and strategy for sustained economic development
Communities and regions need a vision and strategy for economic development. Visioning, planning and implementation efforts should continually involve all sectors, including the voluntary civic sector and those traditionally left out of the public planning process.
6.5 Efforts should be taken that give first priority to support existing enterprises and local entrepreneurship as the best source of business expansion and local job growth 
Because each community's most valuable assets are the ones they already have, and existing businesses are already contributing to their home communities, economic development efforts should give first priority to supporting existing enterprises as the best source of business expansion and local job growth. Luring businesses away from neighboring communities is a zero-sum game that doesn't create new wealth in the regional economy. Community economic development should focus instead on promoting local entrepreneurship to build locally based industries and businesses that can succeed among national and international competitors.
6.6 Communities and regions should identify specific gaps and niches their economies can fill
Communities and regions should identify specific gaps and niches their economies can fill, and promote a diversified range of specialized industry clusters drawing on local advantages to serve local and international markets.
6.7 Publicly supported economic development programs, investments, and subsidies should be evaluated on their long-term benefits and impacts on the whole community, not on short-term job or revenue increases
Publicly supported economic development programs, investments, and subsidies should be evaluated on their long-term benefits and impacts on the whole community, not on short-term job or revenue increases. Public investments and subsidies should be equitable and targeted, support environmental and social goals, and prioritize infrastructure and supportive services that promote the vitality of all local enterprises, instead of individual firms.
6.8 Enterprises have a responsibility to act as civic partners, contributing to the communities and regions where they operate
Enterprises should work as civic partners, contributing to the communities and regions where they operate, protecting the natural environment, and providing workers with good pay, benefits, opportunities for upward mobility, and a healthful work environment.
6.9 New development should take place in existing urban and suburban areas before using more agricultural land or open space
To minimize economic, social, and environmental costs and efficiently use resources and infrastructure, new development should take place in existing urban, suburban, and rural areas before using more agricultural land or open space. Local and regional plans and policies should contain these physical and economic development planning principles to focus development activities in desired existing areas.
6.10 Livable Communities that promote walking, bicycling, and transit access should be available for employment, education, recreation, entertainment, shopping, and services
To protect the natural environment and increase quality of life, neighborhoods, communities and regions should have compact, multi-dimensional land use patterns that ensure a mix of uses, minimize the impact of cars, and promote walking, bicycling, and transit access to employment, education, recreation, entertainment, shopping, and services. Economic development and transportation investments should reinforce these land use patterns, and the ability to move people and goods by non-automobile alternatives wherever possible.
6.11 Communities should have an appropriately scaled and economically healthy center focus
Communities should have an appropriately scaled and economically healthy center focus. At the community level, a wide range of commercial, residential, cultural, civic, and recreational uses should be located in the town center or downtown. At the neighborhood level, neighborhood centers should contain local businesses that serve the daily needs of nearby residents. At the regional level, regional facilities should be located in urban centers that are accessible by transit throughout the metropolitan area.
6.12 Communities should encourage decisions that lead to a distinctive identity
Having a distinctive identity will help communities create a quality of life that is attractive for business retention and future residents and private investment. Community economic development efforts should help to create and preserve each community's sense of uniqueness, attractiveness, history, and cultural and social diversity, and include public gathering places and a strong local sense of place.
6.13 Communities and the private sector should cooperate to create regional structures
Since industries, transportation, land uses, natural resources, and other key elements of a healthy economy are regional in scope, communities and the private sector should cooperate to create regional structures that promote a coherent metropolitan whole that respects local character and identity.

The Principles of Sustainability

The following list of principles is an attempt to provide a set of principles for sustainability applicable at all scales; global, national, regional, local and by the individual. 

PRINCIPLE I PRINCIPLE II PRINCIPLE III PRINCIPLE IV

PRINCIPLE V

PRINCIPLE VI PRINCIPLE VII
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A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

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